Super Gonorrhea: Scientists Discover Antibiotic-Resistant STD – How Does Porn Valley Protect the Workers Against This Without Condoms??

This has been kept very hush, hush in Porn Valley. There’s one article last year and it’s blown off as being overseas only. Ummm, again, Porn Valley sends these pornstars EVERYWHERE IN THE WORLD!!

It’s already reached California and Hawaii. If you look at where the disease has traveled, you will see the path of the Pornstars go to the same places!!

You still think it’s glamorous to have sex with a Pornstar?? Check this out, then we’ll talk!!

July 14, 2011, 05:09 am EST

Finding out you have chlamydia or gonorrhea—though inconvenient and stressful—isn’t the worst thing that can happen. After some antibiotics, you’re back in the game, right? Not necessarily: Researchers recently discovered a new strain of gonorrhea, H014, that can’t be killed with current antibiotics.

But it’s not the first super-strain. “Gonorrhea has a well known history of resisting antibiotics,” says Barbara Jean Van Der Pol, Ph.D., professor at Indiana University, and board member of the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research. “Sixty percent of samples were resistant to penicillin within 50 years of being introduced to the drug.” Gonorrhea is a very complex bacterium with an amazing ability to mutate and resist antibiotics, the CDC says.

In fact, H014 has developed a resistance to all antibiotics, including cephalosporin, the last line of defense. “New antibiotics are desperately needed,” says Van Der Pol.

Should you be worried? Well, considering that gonorrhea—the second most common STD in the U.S.—can cause infertility in men, increase your risk of contracting HIV, and spread to your blood and joints, leading to death . . . yes.

But on the other hand, not much has changed—if you wear condoms. The super-strain may be strong, but it can’t claw through latex.

Just make sure to wear it right: 94 percent of men make a rubber-related error before the act. Let out the air in the tip, which reduces the pressure on the latex, decreasing the chance of breakage—one of our five must-follow condom tips in Your Condom Is On Wrong.

MORE USEFUL STUFF

 

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Scientists have discovered a new strain of gonorrhea-causing bacteria in Japan that is resistant to available treatments.

Since the 1940s, the sexually transmitted disease known as “the clap” has been easily treated with antibiotics. But the new strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has genetically mutated to evade cephalosporins — the only antibiotics still effective against the infection.

“This is both an alarming and a predictable discovery,” lead researcher Magnus Unemo, professor at the Swedish Reference Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria in Örebro, Sweden, said in a statement. “Since antibiotics became the standard treatment for gonorrhea in the 1940s, this bacterium has shown a remarkable capacity to develop resistance mechanisms to all drugs introduced to control it.”

The discovery, announced by Unemo at the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease Research meeting in Quebec City, Canada, could hail gonorrhea’s transition from treatable STD to global public health threat.

“While it is still too early to assess if this new strain has become widespread, the history of newly emergent resistance in the bacterium suggests that it may spread rapidly unless new drugs and effective treatment programs are developed,” Unemo said in a statement.

Cephalosporin-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae joins methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a sinister class of bacteria known as superbugs. But unlike hospital-acquired MRSA and VRE, which spread where antibiotic use runs high and immune defenses run low, super gonorrhea could spread anywhere.

“This report points out that antibiotic resistance is occurring not only in hospitals, but out in the community,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. And while the strain was disovered in Kyoto, Japan, antibiotic-resistant bacteria “don’t need a passport.”

Antibiotic resistance is not a new phenomenon — even for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which developed resistance to several other antibiotics used before cephalosporins.

“We were concerned about this 20 years ago and combated that very effectively,” said Schaffner, explaining how gonorrhea treatments have evolved alongside the bacteria. “But if you have a strain that’s completely resistant to antibiotics, you have to very quickly develop strategies to recognize the resistant strain and alternative treatment regimens.”

Such tests and new treatments could be developed, Schaffner said, but they would likely be more expensive. Amid cutbacks across all facets of research, pharmaceutical companies are investing less in the quest for new antibiotics, he said.

With an estimated 700,000 new cases each year in the U.S. alone, gonorrhea is one of the most common STDs. It spreads through direct contact with the penis, vagina, mouth or anus, and can also be transmitted from mom to baby during delivery.

But only 50 percent of infected women and less than five percent of infected men develop symptoms, such as a burning sensation and discharge. Left untreated, the infection can spread to the skin, blood and other organs causing pain, infertility and even death.

A July 8, 2011, report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged doctors to be on the lookout for gonorrhea resistant to cephalosporins, and to report cases promptly.

The new superbug serves as a reminder that antibiotic resistance is a problem that spreads beyond hospital and nursing home walls.

“We need to implement a program so that pharmaceutical companies are motivated financially to pursue research in developing antibiotics,” Schaffner said. “And both the public and professional have to be much more rigorous in their expectations and use of antibiotics.”

Unstoppable Sex Disease

 

By Daily Mail Reporter

Last updated at 6:41 PM on 10th October 201

A sexual disease that is resistant to all drugs has been discovered by scientists.

They warn the strain of super-gonorrhoea could spread very quickly unless better treatments are developed.

Although only one case has been confirmed, experts fear many more may have gone unreported.

Safe sex? Young adults in the UK are the most likely to catch gonorrhea and account for half of new cases.

Safe sex? Young adults in the UK are the most likely to catch gonorrhea and account for half of new cases.

Until now gonorrhoea has been very easy to treat with antibiotics called cephalosporins. Patients usually need only a single pill or jab.

But Swedish scientists who have analysed the new strain found in Japan believe that over the decades the disease has mutated to become resistant to current treatments.

Magnus Unemo, of the Research Laboratory for Pathogenic Neisseria in Orebro, described it as an alarming discovery. ‘Since antibiotics became the standard treatment for gonorrhoea in the 1940s, this bacterium has shown a remarkable capacity to develop resistance mechanisms to all drugs introduced to control it,’ he said. 

Infection: The gonococci bacteria that causes gonorrhea. A new strain of the STI has been discovered

Infection: The gonococci bacteria that causes gonorrhea. A new strain of the STI has been discovered

‘While it is still too early to assess if this new strain has become widespread, the history of newly emergent resistance in the bacterium suggests that it may spread rapidly unless new drugs and effective treatment programs are developed.’  

Dr David Livermore, of the Health Protection Agency, said that while antibiotics were still effective at treating gonorrhea there were signs of growing resistance to them. ‘Our lab tests show that the bacteria are becoming less sensitive to these cephalosporins, with a few treatment failures reported,’ he added.

‘This means that we are having to change the type of cephalosporin that is used and to increase the dosage.

‘The worry is that we will see gonorrhea becoming a much more difficult infection to treat over the next five years. 

‘Prevention is better than cure, especially as cure becomes harder, and the most reliable way to protect against sexually transmitted infections – including resistant gonorrhea – is to use a condom with all new and casual partners.’

The new strain of the sexually transmitted disease called H041 – was found in Japan and leaves doctors with no other option than to try untested medicines to combat it. Left untreated it can cause infertility in women and men and can be life threatening if it spreads to the blood and joints.

Some 16,700 Britons are infected with gonorrhea every year and it is one of the most common STIs after chlamydia.

The 16-24 age group accounts for almost half of all cases.

Rebecca Findlay, from the Family Planning Association, urged wider use of contraception. 

‘Prevention is better than cure, especially as cure becomes harder,’ she said. ‘Prevention becomes more important because we know antibiotics won’t always work.

‘Gonorrhea can affect people of all ages and everyone should be now focusing on looking after their sexual health.’

More…

INFECTION TAKES MONTHS TO SHOW

One of the problems with gonorrhea is that its symptoms take time to become apparent. Around half of women and one in ten men will not be aware they have the disease for several months.  In women, the infection can spread to the womb and ovaries and increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. The very painful condition has been linked to infertility and ectopic pregnancy, wherein the foetus develops outside the womb and cannot survive.

Men can also develop infections in the testes and prostate gland which can reduce their fertility.

Rates of sexually transmitted infections have increased over the past decade, although the number of cases has begun to level off.

Experts have blamed increased promiscuity, particularly among the young.

 

 

 

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